Second Chances and the WAG Program at Clallam Bay

Main text by Douglas Gallagher, Incarcerated Dog Trainer at Clallam Bay Corrections Center
Introduction by Bethany J. Shepler, Green Track Program Coordinator

Incarcerated dog handlers reunite with a dog they trained at the second annual reunion on October 17, 2017. Photo by Brian Harmon, taken from http://www.wagsequimwa.com/PrisonProgram.html

At the Sustainability Fair at Clallam Bay Corrections Center (CBCC), I had the chance to learn about the Welfare for Animals Guild (WAG) dog program. WAG works with incarcerated dog handlers at CBCC to train dogs who have been labeled as “unadoptable.” Since the program’s inception in 2012, incarcerated dog handlers have trained over 200 adult dogs and puppies. This training often includes teaching the dogs to trust people, interact with other dogs, and perform for common commands. 99% of the dogs that have gone through training at CBCC has been adopted into a forever home! Each one went through WAG’s rigorous adoption process including applications, interviews, and inspecting the potential house. Check out WAG’s Facebook page and their website for more information about the work they do (and for beautiful dog portraits).

Welfare for Animals Guild (WAG) at Clallam Bay Corrections Center (CBCC). Photo by Bethany Shepler.

The dog program sponsor at CBCC, Tanja Cain, worked with WAG to establish a “Reunion Day.” Dogs return to the prison for a day along with their adoptive parents. Incarcerated dog handlers get to see dogs they helped train and meet the people who adopted them. And the dogs get to see the people who gave them a second chance at life. When the dogs arrive, they know exactly where they are and rush to their former handlers with wagging tails and lots of kisses.

Mr. Gallagher is a certified trainer working at CBCC and he gave a speech at the Sustainability Fair about the WAG program and what it means to him.

The WAG program and what it means to me

My name Douglas Gallagher and I have been in the dog program here at Clallam Bay since March of 2014. In the last five years, I have had the pleasure of training 26 dogs. I have also become a Certified Behavior Adjustment Trainer Instructor otherwise known as a “CBATI” something I am very proud of.

Mr. Gallagher was one of the incarcerated handlers who helped to train Andy. Even though Andy is a little shy, he agreed to pose for this photo. Photo by Bethany Shepler.

When I first got into the program, I knew nothing about training dogs, and in fact, felt a little overwhelmed by it all. I was lucky to move in with someone who had trained a few dogs, and he assured me that if I read all of the books and paid attention, I would learn fast and become confident in my abilities. As nervous as I was about my newfound responsibility, I took to it as a fish takes to water. I read all of the books that were provided to us, watched the videos and worked with the other handlers who had more experience than I did. And I learned how to work as part of a team. It was a challenge, and coming from a background where I only cared about myself, it took some time for me to adjust to it all and I love it.

Here’s Andy’s portrait picture from WAG’s Facebook page. Photo credit: Dog Light Photography.

You see, like most of the dogs that we get from WAG, I too was broken. When I came back to prison with my third strike, I was at my wit’s end. Drug addiction had broken me, and I had a long road of recovery before me. Over the last several years in the program, I have become a new person.

I could identify with the dogs that WAG brings us because like most of them, I knew what it was like to be cast off. The program has taught me more than I ever thought it would – how to be responsible, how to be patient, to have empathy, how to work with others, and most of all, how to love. When I get a fearful dog who won’t even take treats, and nurse it back to health and watch it transform into a new dog, it brings me great joy. There are just no words to describe it. Each dog has its issues, just like us. Each dog is unique in its own way, just like us. Each day I look forward to learning something new. When I first joined the program I knew that it was going to be a challenge, and take a lot of dedication, yet I had no idea just how fulfilling it would be. There is no greater feeling than watching a broken dog become whole and go to its forever home. I want to thank WAG and Ms. Cain for allowing all of us handlers to participate in this life-changing endeavor. Now I will share some quotes from some of the other handlers.

“The dog program gives me a sense of purpose and allows me to make a positive impact on the lives of dogs as well as myself. All while giving me skills that I can use to help me to be successful out in the community and prevent me from re-offending.” Mr. Thompson


“What the dog program means to me is: love, passion for life, teaching, and learning!” Mr. Parren

“This dog program has helped me grow as a person. It showed me how to be responsible and not be a selfish person. Now I have someone that depends on me for everything and I love it. This program gives me a sense of self-worth.” Mr. De Le Cruz

“It has made me less selfish.” Mr. Osalde

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