Woodland Park Zoo
WPZ

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Located in Seattle, Woodland Park Zoo (WPZ) hosts over 1 million visitors annually and puts member dues to work in a variety of conservation projects. Through education programs, research initiatives, and in-zoo breeding and release programs, WPZ is having a positive influence on ecosystems within the Pacific Northwest and around the world. As a member of the Oregon spotted frog (OSF) recovery group, WPZ has raised nearly 2,000 OSF for release onto Joint Base Lewis-McChord. Additionally, the zoo’s western pond turtle recovery effort, started in 1990, has raised baby turtles in captivity for release into the wild, and has helped the turtle population grow from just 150 animals to over 1000 currently.

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Jennifer Pramuk, curator at Woodland Park Zoo, holds a young turtle raised at the zoo. Photo by Sadie Gilliom.

WPZ has been an important partner to the SPP in many ways. As partners in the OSF recovery effort, WPZ staff have been patient and effective advisors to SPP’s frog rearing program. Additionally, experts from the zoo have provided valuable advice and hands-on training in the development of Cedar Creek Corrections Center’s cricket rearing program and provided inmates with a colony of the Jamaican field cricket (Gryllus assimilis), a very successful breeder—these crickets provide a low-cost source of food for OSF. Most recently, WPZ has been a necessary partner on SPP’s newest program, caring for Western pond turtles.

Two Oregon spotted frog hang out in their tank at Cedar Creek Corrections Center. Photo by Matthew Williams of the New York Times.

Two Oregon spotted frog hang out in their tank at Cedar Creek Corrections Center. Photo by Matthew Williams of the New York Times.