Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s
WDFW

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (WDFW) mission is to preserve, protect and perpetuate fish, wildlife, and ecosystems while providing sustainable recreational and commercial opportunities. Applied science plays an integral role in shaping resource-management decisions at WDFW. Scientists in each of the Department’s resource programs—Fish, Wildlife and Habitat—draw from published research, monitoring data, field studies, and other sources to provide a solid, scientific foundation for the Department’s adopted management policies.

WDFW has been a critical partner in our conservation programs working with rare and endangered species. Captive rearing programs would not be possible without their collaboration and oversight. Currently, WDFW works alongside SPP and other program partners on four conservation programs:

  1. Raising over 50 species of rare and endangered plant species for south Salish lowland prairie restoration at three facilities: Stafford Creek Corrections Center, Shotwell’s Landing Nursery (a Center for Natural Lands Management (CNLM) facility staffed by SPP, crews from Cedar Creek Corrections Center, and CNLM), and Washington Corrections Center for Women. These conservation nurseries have dramatically increased the capacity of prairie restoration efforts, and the species raised are those most needed for the recovery of rare prairie-dependent butterflies, including Taylor’s checkerspot.

    David Hays, land manager for WDFW, shows his enthusiasm for the greatly increased yields of rare Plectritis congesta seed at Shotwell’s Landing nursery. Photos by Jaal Mann.

    David Hays, land manager for WDFW, shows his enthusiasm for the greatly increased yields…

    ...of rare Plectritis congesta seed at Shotwell’s Landing nursery. Photos by Jaal Mann.

    …of rare Plectritis congesta seed at Shotwell’s Landing nursery. Photos by Jaal Mann.

     

  2. Rearing the federally-endangered Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly (Euphydras editha taylori) at Mission Creek Corrections Center. For this program, a grant from the U.S. Army Compatible Use Buffer program provided funding to build a state-of-the-art butterfly lab at the prison. A WDFW biologist and the Oregon Zoo have worked closely with SPP staff and inmate crew to create an exceptionally productive butterfly program.
    mary-prairie

    WDFW biologist Mary Linders is a key partner in our Taylor’s checkerspot program. Here she releases Taylor’s checkerspot caterpillars raised at Mission Creek Corrections Center. Photo by SPP staff.

     

  3. Western pond turtles (Emys marmorata) Rehabilitation programs at Cedar Creek and Larch Corrections Center. Technicians provide daily care to turtles recovering from a shell disease until they are ready for release back to the wild. Oversight and guidance from WDFW biologists are key to the programs’ success.

    Turtle technicians at Cedar Creek Corrections Center work with a turtle in their care. Photo by Ricky Osborne.

  4. Rearing state-endangered Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) at Cedar Creek Corrections Center for six seasons, ending in 2015. WDFW provided training to the graduate research assistants and inmates that have worked with the frogs, and guides research. WDFW has also coordinated the release of the frogs into wild habitat at Joint Base Lewis-McChord and overseen the egg mass surveys that measure reproductive success of prison-raised frogs.

    Inmate technician, WDFW biologist Marc Hayes, and graduate research assistants Andrea Martin and Brittany Gallagher work side-by-side to monitor the health and growth of Oregon spotted frogs reared at Cedar Creek Corrections Center. Photo by Cyril Ruoso.

    Inmate technicians, WDFW biologist Marc Hayes, and graduate research assistants Andrea Martin and Brittany Gallagher work side-by-side to monitor the health and growth of Oregon spotted frogs reared at Cedar Creek Corrections Center. Photo by Cyril Ruoso.

Periodically, WDFW biologist identify opportunities for new ways to partner with SPP, and the scope and success of the partnership continues to increase. SPP’s ecological conservation programs benefit WDFW by contributing to species’ recovery plans and providing settings and staff for research benefiting endangered species.