US Fish and Wildlife Service
USFWS


The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) has three main objectives (from their website):

[F]irst, assist in the development and application of an environmental stewardship ethic for our society, based on ecological principles, scientific knowledge of fish and wildlife, and a sense of moral responsibility; second, guide the conservation, development, and management of the Nation’s fish and wildlife resources; and third, administer a national program to provide the public opportunities to understand, appreciate, and wisely use fish and wildlife resources.

David Hays (WDFW), Karla Drewson (USFWS), and Ted Thomas (USFWS) discuss giant red Indian paintbrush (Castilleja miniata) plants for prairie propagation. Photo by Jaal Mann.

David Hays (WDFW), Karla Drewson (USFWS), and Ted Thomas (USFWS) discuss giant red Indian paintbrush (Castilleja miniata) plants for prairie propagation. Photo by Jaal Mann.

One of the major ways these objectives are met is through the management of 551 National Wildlife Refuges throughout the country. Several refuges in the northwest are home to populations of Oregon spotted frogs, and from 2008 to 2012 these sites served as donors to the OSF recovery project. Egg masses were taken from the sites and raised in captivity, leading to much higher egg-to-adult success rates than if the eggs had developed in the presence of predators and other environmental stressors.

The USFWS administers the Endangered Species Act and helps to manage the recovery efforts of all threatened and endangered species in the US. SPP works closely with our partners at USFWS on our recovery efforts for all endangered species in our care. For example, in addition to their involvement with the OSF recovery group, the USFWS also administered the funds from the Army Compatible Use Buffer program which paid for the Taylor’s checkerspot rearing facility at Mission Creek Corrections Center for Women.

Butterfly greenhouse at Mission Creek Corrections Center. Photo by Benj Drummond.

Butterfly greenhouse at Mission Creek Corrections Center. Photo by Benj Drummond.