Oregon Spotted Frog Recovery Group

Oregon spotted frog reared in captivity at Cedar Creek Corrections Center receive careful handling and examination prior to release. Photo by Cyril Ruoso.

Oregon spotted frog reared in captivity at Cedar Creek Corrections Center receive careful handling and examination prior to release. Photo by Cyril Ruoso.

The Oregon Spotted Frog (OSF) is a state-endangered species in Washington and a candidate for federal listing. The OSF Recovery Group is a collaborative network of scientists and conservation leaders from several organizations who work together to protect and restore populations of this species. The group shares captive rearing protocols, participates in field surveys of habitat areas to monitor frog populations and evidence of reproduction, and contributes valuable research necessary to conserving the species.

All members of the group have been generous partners with SPP; they have helped to educate inmate technicians who raise frogs at Cedar Creek Corrections Center about amphibians and conservation strategies. In addition to SPP, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Woodland Park Zoo, the Oregon Zoo, and Joint Base Lewis-McChord, the following organizations contribute to the recovery group.

 

Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium
PDZA

Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium (PDZA) is the only joint zoo and aquarium in the Pacific Northwest. Located in Tacoma, PDZA is a member of the Tacoma Metropolitan Park District. PDZA offers a variety of exhibits to the more than 600,000 visitors it hosts annually. In addition to exhibits and education, PDZA is committed to conservation. With generous private support from the Point Defiance Zoo Society, they have made significant contributions to protecting wildlife through a variety of venues, from endangered species breeding programs to public education.

PDZA does not rear frogs in captivity, but offers insight, expertise, and financial support to the recovery group. Additionally, PDZA has supported SPP through partnership on grant proposals to fund the frog-rearing program at Cedar Creek Corrections Center.

Graduate Research Assistant Brittany Gallagher releases a frog raised at Cedar Creek Corrections Center. Photo by Cyril Ruoso.

Graduate Research Assistant Brittany Gallagher releases a frog raised at Cedar Creek Corrections Center. Photo by Cyril Ruoso.

Northwest Trek Wildlife Park
Trek

NW-Trek-Logo

Northwest Trek Wildlife Park (Trek) is a 723-acre wildlife park in Eatonville, WA. Trek is dedicated to conservation, education, and recreation; it realizes its mission by displaying, interpreting and researching native northwest wildlife and their natural habitats. Visitors to the park get to observe animals native to the local area in their natural habitat through a variety of education and touring programs. Currently, the park’s staff members work directly with four endangered species: fishers (a large member of the weasel family), trumpeter swans, western toads, and the Oregon spotted frog (OSF).

Trek has been an important player in the Oregon spotted frog recovery effort, managing communication between partners and raising frogs in captivity: Trek has raised more than 1,200 OSF for release at JBLM. Additionally, park staff and veterinarians have been huge supporters of SPP programs and have provided expertise and medicine when the frog populations at Cedar Creek Corrections Center have needed extra care.